Ottoman Uniforms
Ottoman Uniforms

1828 TILL 1856 OTTOMAN NAVY

1828 Ottoman Imperial Navy Galeonjees (Marine Corps)

Right - Extracted from the Vinkhuizjen Collection illustrations which showa a figure, dated 1828 (in pen ink), identified as the Galeonjees (Marine Corps), in the 1828;

  • However, he is also wearing a Fez from 1832.
  • This figure is ranked as a YOUSH BASHEE (Captain) of the Galeonjees (Marine Corps), as he is wearing: Four pairs of large chest buttons: Identified as a YUSH BASHEE (Captain).
  • The same description is given to a figure in the Anne S.K. Brown Military Collection, however, that figure wears a set of gold tape chest loops ending in gold tassels, was worn by the ‘Chef de Bataillon’, a BIMBASHEE (Major), in this period.

Right - Illustrated in Mahmud Sevket Pasa ‘L'Organisation et les Uniformes de l'Armee Ottomanne' (1907), the Imperial Navy uniform for the red coated Galeonjees (Marine Corps), from post-1832, wearing the large 'Tar bucket' -shako fez of the 1840s. These were re-uniformed in blue uniforms by the time of the Crimean War (see below). These 'modern' Ottoman Imperial Navy uniforms were closely patterned on Army uniforms.

Left - Replica uniforms on display in the Turkish Navy Museum, are a reasonable approximation of the Galeonjees (Marine Corps), in the 1830s. However, the headgear used is later modern fez.

1832 Ottoman Imperial Navy Officers

Right - Illustrated in Mahmud Sevket Pasa ‘L'Organisation et les Uniformes de l'Armee Ottomanne' (1907), the Imperial Navy uniform for officers, in 1832.

  • This later transitioned from the yellow/gold tunic, into the dress blue uniforms of the 1850s.
  • These 'modern' Ottoman Imperial Navy uniforms were closely patterned on Army uniforms.

1841 Ottoman Navy Rank Flags

Right - The 1841 Ottoman Navy Rank Flags.

Ottoman Imperial Navy Crews During the Crimean War

Right - Illustrated in Mahmud Sevket Pasa ‘L'Organisation et les Uniformes de l'Armee Ottomanne' (1907):

  • 1850s Navy Artillery officer.
  • 1850s Sea-soldier in the 1850.

The uniforms of the Ottoman Imperial Navy closely followed that of the land-army.

  • The navy like the army was undergoing a period of transition between the end of 1853 with the abolition of 'orders' and the adoption, later in 1861 of the new rank system using gold and silver cuff chevrons.
  • There was an 'eight-year' gap, where officers are still in service holding the older orders, which are withdrawn as individuals were promoted, retired or died.

During the Crimean War period, a temporary/experimental system was in place that operated as a set of basic rank-bands where officers wore the same uniform/rank insignia.

Ottoman Imperial Navy Sea-Soldiers (Sailors)

The uniforms/rank insignia of the sea-soldiers is not documented. However, it is clear from the illustration:

  • They were wearing red shirts (that button along the right shoulder).
  • Junior officers wore jackets.

1850 Ottoman Imperial Navy Galeonjees (Marine Corps)

Right -  The Galeonjees (Marine Corps), in the 1850s were uniformed in blue army shell-jackets, fitted with large brass shoulder scales.

  • Untill 1860, when the zouave uniform was introduced with the new 1860 rank system, the Galeonjees (Marine Corps), being only a small battalion sized regiment continued post 1853, with the orders of rank; as most of the officers and men, would have continued in service with little or no significant change in personnel over the 1850s, and through the Crimean War period.
  • As it was, the Lieutenant, Captain and Major Galeonjees (Marine Corps), wore as a 'band-of-ranks' the exact same pattern epaulettes (as was worn in the Army).
  • There is a possibility that the junior officers - often referred to as NCOs, these were the ‘Bascavus’ (Sergeant-major), ‘Bascavus Muavini’ (Assistant Sergeant-major), and Cavus (Sergeant), and all three ranks wore the exact same collar distinction:

Their rank-band is identified by the white tape chevron on the collar (following the Army pattern, with was in red on a blue collar).

Ottoman Imperial Navy Ship's Livery

Right - The paint scheme for Ottoman Imperial Navy ships during the Crimean War was white sides with black trim and ports (with red insides).

Below - The gold lettering and gold painted decorations, complete the livery. The ships’ hind is decorated with the ships name under a star within an olive leaf wreath.

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